Difference between revisions of "Night Racer"

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==External links==
 
==External links==
 
* [http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=8867 Night Racer at KLOV.]
 
* [http://www.arcade-museum.com/game_detail.php?game_id=8867 Night Racer at KLOV.]
 +
* [http://www.mobygames.com/game/arcade/night-racer_ Night Racer at mobygames.]
 
* [http://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=thumbs&db=videodb&id=731 Night Racer at TAFA.]
 
* [http://flyers.arcade-museum.com/?page=thumbs&db=videodb&id=731 Night Racer at TAFA.]
 
* [http://allincolorforaquarter.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-pre-history-of-night-driver-part-2.html Night Racer at The Golden Age Arcade Historian.]
 
* [http://allincolorforaquarter.blogspot.com/2014/06/the-pre-history-of-night-driver-part-2.html Night Racer at The Golden Age Arcade Historian.]

Latest revision as of 18:16, 19 April 2019

Night Racer
Developer(s) Digital Games
Publisher(s) Micronetics
Release date(s) 1976/Dec.
Genre(s)
Mode(s)
Platform(s)
Arcade system(s) Discrete Logic
Arcade display Raster

Atari's Night Driver and Midway's 280-ZZAP are (licensed?) clones of this game in terms of gameplay, but using a microprocessor. Night Racer's development was inspired by Nürburgring/1.

Supposedly Micronetics wanted to use a microprocessor, but in the end used discrete logic.

A claim on KLOV is that "there appears to be a custom CPU on one of the boards" but this could be a CPU implemented in discrete logic (like the Cinematronics cinemat.cpp games), or just one of KLOV's many inaccuracies.

Also seen 03/1977 as date for this.

External links[edit]